Disease Synopsis
Overview
Drugs and Clinical Candidates
Clinical Trials (visual)
Clinical Trials (text)
Cell Line Models
Chemistry

Ovarian Cancer - Overview - Disease Synopsis

Drugs & Clinical Candidates


14 drugs have received FDA approval for Ovarian Cancer . Amifostine, Bevacizumab, Carboplatin, Cisplatin, Cyclophosphamide, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, Melphalan Hydrochloride, Niraparib, Olaparib, Paclitaxel, Rucaparib camsylate, Thiotepa and Topotecan Hydrochloride
268 drugs have a clinical trial registered for Ovarian Cancer.

Sources: cancer.gov and clinicaltrials.gov
(see details)

Clinical Trials


There are 1434 clinical trials for Ovarian Cancer,
866 of which have one or more drug interventions,
568 with no drug intervention.

Sources: cancer.gov and clinicaltrials.gov
(see details)

Cell Line Models


There are 261 Cell Line Models for Ovarian Cancer.

Source: COSMIC
(see details)

Chemistry


There are 5988 Compounds which have been tested in Ovarian Cancer , 4059 <= 500nM potency.

Source: ChEMBL
(see details)

Mappings


Please note the mappings below are based on an imperfect algorithm. If you notice any anomalies please report them to us.

The following terms have been mapped from clinicaltrials.gov mesh condition terms to Ovarian Cancer:
Brenner Tumor
Carcinoma, Ovarian Epithelial
Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome
Krukenberg Tumor
Ovarian Neoplasms

The following terms have been mapped from cancer.gov to Ovarian Cancer:
Ovarian cancer
Ovarian cancer in patients whose disease has not gotten better with other chemotherapy
Ovarian cancer that has certain germline mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene and is advanced. It is used in adults who have already been treated with at least three other types of chemotherapy
Ovarian cancer that has gotten worse or recurred (come back) after treatment with other chemotherapy
Ovarian cancer that has metastasized (spread to other parts of the body). It is used with other drugs in patients who have already had surgery or radiation therapy. It is used alone in patients whose disease has not gotten better with other types of treatment or chemotherapy
Ovarian cancer that is advanced and has not gotten better with other chemotherapy. It is used with carboplatin
Ovarian cancer that is advanced. It is used with other chemotherapy as first-line treatment. It is used alone as palliative treatment for disease that has recurred (come back) after earlier chemotherapy
Ovarian epithelial cancer that cannot be removed by surgery
Ovarian epithelial, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer. It is used as maintenance therapy in adults who are having a complete or partial response to platinum chemotherapy. It is used in patients with:Advanced disease that has certain germline or somatic mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene
Ovarian epithelial, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer. It is used as maintenance therapy in patients with recurrent disease who are having a complete or partial response to platinum chemotherapy
Ovarian epithelial, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer. It is used in patients with stage III, stage IV, or recurrent disease. This use is approved for the Avastin brand of bevacizumab
Ovarian epithelial, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer. It is used:As maintenance therapy in adults with recurrent disease who are having a complete or partial response to platinum chemotherapy
Renal (kidney) toxicity. It is used to reduce the nephrotoxic effects caused by repeated treatment with cisplatin for advanced ovarian cancer